Saturday, August 19, 2017

Industries News

Leading 50 liner shipping companies by number of ships and total shipboard capacity deployed in twenty-foot equivalent units

  Ships               End-2014              End-2015                                                                  End-July 2016

                           Ships Capacity    Ships  Capacity   Ships   Capacity Average       Market share
                                                                                                                      vessel size   (percentage)
                                                                                                                                         
Maersk                592    2 792 124  619   3 059 984    616     3 007 392   4 882                15.1

Mediterranean Shipping
Company            477    2 495 439   479  2 703 404    465     2 661 135   5 723                 13.4

CMA CGM         454    1 691 290   459  1 873 439     435    1 829 951   4 207                   9.2

China Ocean Shipping (Group)
Company             272    1 524 588   283  1 608 456    268     1 554 434   5 800                  7.8

Hapag-Lloyd       186        974 430   182     978 663    174        956 194   5 495                 4.8

Evergreen            199        947 159   194     949 492    189        937 957   4 963                  4.7

Hamburg Süd      126        584 944   138     670 029     132       651 549   4 936                  3.3

Hanjin Shipping    98        595 056   110     648 043     101        617 665   6 115                 3.1

Orient Overseas
Container Line     103        527 827   109    571 429      111        589 476  5 311                  3.0

Neptune Orient Lines –
American President
Lines                       99         604 073      90   567 635       89      564 028     6 337                  2.8

Mitsui Osaka Shosen
Kaisha Lines        106        560 678      98    542 909        93     531 376     5 714                  2.7

Yang Ming Marine
Transport                85       389 614    100   542 127         97     520 580     5 367                  2.6

United Arab
Shipping Company 53       338 532      51   452 510        54     510 296     9 450                  2.6

Nippon Yusen
Kaisha                    104       508 801    101   493 443       100    500 165     5 002                   2.5

Hyundai Merchant
Marine                       63      385 753      56    381 728        57     401 152     7 038                  2.0

Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha
Limited – K Line       69        340 347     71    397 557        68     380 851     5 601                 1.9

Zim Integrated
Shipping Services    83        350 255      85   368 884        79     343 598     4 349                 1.7

Pacific International
Lines                        171      410 512     135   336 699      129    332 403      2 577                   1.7

Wan Hai Lines          85      195 481       92   217 847        98    255 124      2 603                  1.3

X-Press Feeders        81      127 021       75   116 709        82    131 686      1 606                  0.7

Republic of Korea Marine
Transport Company   65      103 130        65   109 012       66     112 659     1 707                 0.6

Islamic Republic of
Iran Shipping Lines    28        93 372        27     92 674       27      92 674      3 432                 0.5

Shandong International Transportation
Corporation                 65       76 254          76     98 573      73      90 909       1 245                 0.5
Arkas Container
Transport                     40       58 498          45     67 237      45      68 388       1 520                 0.3

 T S Lines                     38        70 245         44      91 308      33      61 512       1 864                0.3

Simatech Shipping      15        36 269         20      55 984      20      58 802        2 940               0.3

Regional Container
Lines                             30        52 096         30      54 771      30      56 790        1 893               0.3

Sinokor Merchant
Marine                          29        41 656         36      45 121      40      56 636        1 416               0.3

Nile Dutch                    30        95 296         16      48 867     15       49 866        3 324               0.3

Transworld Group of
Companies                    23        34 730         24      40 256      28     46 379         1 656              0.2

Heung-A Shipping      33         41 263         35     49 199       34     39 777         1 17               0.2

Matson                          24         52 223         20     40 952       19     39 484         2 07               0.2

Unifeeder                       56         57 856          40    43 395        37    39 259         1 06              0.2

China Merchants 
Group                              27        39 471          29    37 238        29    38 508          1 328            0.2

STRUCTURE, OWNERSHIP AND REGISTRATION OF THE WORLD FLEET 

Leading 50 liner shipping companies by number of ships and total shipboard capacity deployed in twenty-foot equivalent units (continued) D. CONTAINER SHIP DEPLOYMENT AND LINER SHIPPING CONNECTIVITY 1.

Country-level connectivity The trend towards consolidation in the industry is also reflected in the data on fleet deployment.

Container ship sizes per country – both average and maximum – are rising, while the number of companies providing services to and from the average country’s seaports is falling.

The number of carriers competing for the average country’s cargo has declined by 34 per cent in 12 years, from 21.1 carriers in 2004 to 14.6 carriers in 2016.

While 14.6 companies per country would usually suffice to guarantee a competitive market, the average does not reveal the growing number of countries in which there are only a few providers offering container services, leading to potentially oligopolistic markets.

In 2004, there Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on data from Clarksons Research.

Note: Includes all container ships known to be operated by liner shipping companies ranked by total TEUs. Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on data from Clarksons Research.

One Belt, One Road Initiative: Projected infrastructure investments by China

Bangladesh Studies for Bangladesh–China–India–Myanmar corridor; deepwater port, Payra

Belarus Mining and processing infrastructure, Starobinskoye ($1.4 billion); Sino-Belarus Industrial Park, Minsk ($5 billion)

Fiji Hydroelectric plant ($158 million)

Georgia International economic zone, Tbilisi ($150 million); deepwater port, Anaklia ($5 billion)

India High-speed rail cooperation; industrial parks, Gujarat and Maharashtra

Indonesia Jakarta–Bandung high-speed railway; coal mining and transport infrastructure, Papua and Kalimantan ($6 billion); road and port infrastructure, Kalimantan ($1.1 billion); ferronickel plant, Sulawesi ($5.1 billion)

Kazakhstan China–Kazakhstan oil pipeline; development of special economic zone Khorgos-East Gate at Kazakhstan–China border

Kyrgyzstan China–Kyrgyzstan–Uzbekistan highway; China–Uzbekistan railway ($2 billion); power grid upgrades, southern Kyrgyzstan; power plant refurbishment, Bishkek; transport and logistics cooperation

Lithuania Encouraging investment in joint railway and port projects; China Merchants Group letter of intent with port of Klaipeda

Malaysia Malaysia–China Kuantan Industrial Park, including deepwater container port, steel and aluminium plants and palm oil refinery ($3.4 billion)

Myanmar Bangladesh–China–India–Myanmar transport network, including roads, railways, waterways and airports; Kyaukphyu– Kunming oil and gas pipelines; Myanmar–Yunnan optical cable

Pakistan China–Pakistan economic corridor, roads and railway ($46 billion); Lahore–Karachi highway; port upgrades, including airport, power plant and roads, Gwadar; coal mine and power plant, Gadani; 720,000 kW Karot Hydropower Plant; soft loans for two nuclear power plants near Karachi ($6.5 billion)

Sri Lanka Deepwater port in Hambantota ($600 million); China Merchants Holdings International investment in Port of Colombo ($500 million)

Russian Federation Kazan–Moscow high-speed railway; Siberian gas pipelines to supply China

Thailand Kra Isthmus Canal ($28 billion); Kunming–Bangkok highway; railway between Nong Kahi, Bangkok and proposed China–Lao People’s Democratic Republic railway

Tajikistan Central Asia–China gas pipeline; 500kV power substation reconstruction, Tursunzoda; Dushanbe–Chanak highway upgrades ($280 million)

Turkmenistan Islamic Republic of Iran–Kazakhstan–Turkmenistan road and rail network
Uzbekistan Uzbekistan–China gas pipeline Viet Nam Port upgrades, Haiphong; Lang Son–Hanoi highway

Africa Agreement with African Union to help build railways, roads and airports; coastal road, Nigeria ($13 billion); Nairobi–Mombasa railway, Kenya ($3.8 billion); Addis Ababa–Djibouti railway ($4 billion)

Central and South America Pledged investment to region ($250 billion); proposed transcontinental railway between coasts of Brazil and Peru ($10 billion); natural gas development, pipelines, power generation facilities, highways, ports and telecommunications

Europe Upgrade of Port of Piraeus, Greece ($260 million); Hungary–Serbia high-speed railway ($3 billion); China–Spain cargo railway (12,875 km)

One Belt, One Road Initiative: Projected infrastructure investments by China infrastructure development in Asia over the next five years (Japan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 2015). The initiative is expected to meet infrastructure demand
and achieve quality and quantity in infrastructure by mobilizing further financial resources and know-how
from the private sector. Examples of related projects include the Delhi Metro, India; Ulaanbaatar railway flyover,
Mongolia; and Viet Nam–Japan Friendship Bridge.

Trade policy and liberalization developments Government policies and interventions contribute to
shaping international trade patterns, including seaborne

Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on Australia Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 2015; and Hong Kong [China]Trade Development Council, 2016.